Teacher Spotlight - Mr Reid
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week Eleanor Cruickshank talks to Ewan Reid, Principal Teacher Curriculum of Support for Learning.


     
 

Full Name:

Ewan Douglas Reid

 
  Place of Birth:
Sydney, Australia
 
  Education:
Primary school in Sydney, Waggawagga High School, University of Canberra (teacher training) and Sunderland University (Masters Degree)
 
  Hobbies:
Playing drums, and since he came to Scotland, Munro bagging (he has climbed 7 so far).
 
  Interesting fact:
Was bitten by a red belly black snake aged 10. It nearly took his kneecap off and he was in hospital for a week.
 
 
     

Eleanor

What does your job as Principal Teacher of Support for Learning involve?

Mr Reid
In general, having an oversight of the support pupils in Madras receive. This largely involves attending a lot of meetings! I hold meetings with parents, teachers, social workers and psychologists. I also spend lots of time with primary schools, thinking about certain strategies we could put in place there. But we also support teachers throughout the faculties at Madras so that they can put across these strategies effectively in their own classrooms as well.

Eleanor

What inspired you to involve yourself with Support for Learning?

Mr Reid
I wanted to be able to make a difference in the lives of those who have different support needs.

Eleanor

Do you feel that Support for Learning gets the focus it needs within the school?

Mr Reid
It is certainly growing in the profile it gets, and there is definite recognition and inclusion of those with additional support needs. Madras is particularly good at this, but I suppose there could always be more!

Eleanor

At Madras, the peer tutoring scheme gives sixth year pupils the opportunity to volunteer with the Support for Learning department. How effective do you feel this is?

Mr Reid
It makes a huge difference – I even get parents telling me how much it has helped their child! It is a situation where everyone wins; the classroom teachers get an extra pair of hands, the peer tutor gets valuable experience, and of course the pupils themselves benefit from having a mentor. In the cases when parents feed these positive comments back to me, it is clearly a very effective system.
Eleanor

And finally, what has been the most rewarding experience of your career?

Mr Reid
I would have to say that it’s the little things: when you actually work alongside a pupil and see progress. When the pieces of the puzzle fit together and they start to thrive, that’s what I find most rewarding.

Eleanor

Thank you very much for your time, Mr Reid.

by Eleanor Cruickshank